Spring Greens

As we move into early summer, I thought I’d pause for a second to take you on a short tour of my local park to see the fresh, light greens of spring.

Christchurch Mansion through the trees.

The horse chestnuts have reached full leaf and underneath their canopy the reduced light supplies dramatic contrasts between bold, sturdy tree trunks and verdant, recently cut grass.

Sweeping and undulating paths.

Together with the horse chestnuts, lime trees line the paths of the park accentuating the curves and sweeps.

The War Memorial through the trees.

There’s not just fresh green but delicate coppery apricot colours too.

Mature lime with old knobbly trunk.

The new leaves in the park are most welcome, but there’s something even more uplifting when you observe the re-emergence of sea kale (crambe maritime) on beaches at this time of year. The plant’s sheer tenacity as it pushes up through the salty shingle for another season of sun, wind and rain is very pleasing.

The new growth of crambe maritime (sea kale) on Sizewell Beach.

Stealing from other people’s gardens

OsteospermumAs you may already know earlier this year I left behind my Norfolk home and garden of 12 years and moved south to Suffolk. In actual fact it is a return to Suffolk after 21 years away, but, as yet, I am still in temporary accommodation and it’s a flat with no garden.

Sea-kale-Crambe-MaritimaAs suggested by fellow bloggers I’ve been out and about stealing from other people’s gardens, local parks and even from the shoreline on the Shotley Peninsula. No, not digging up precious specimens in the dead of night, but stealing shots of all the different blooms I’ve spotted on my wanderings. Braving the salty breeze, along with the naturally adapted sea kale (above), I found these petunias and osteospermums surviving at the bottom of a local garden close to the estuary shore.

It has been good for me as I’ve had to identify all kinds of plants that have been new to me rather than just relying on the old favourites. The flora in the local park has moved on from the early to the late flowering plants with this sweep full of bee favourites.

September-park-flowers-for-beesThe bees have introduced me to new wildflowers such as the Devil’s Bit scabious (Succisa pratensis) as well as reminding me that some standard garden shrubs, for example this purple hebe, are also a good source of nectar.

The drifts of perennial and annual flowers were truly buzzing in the September sunshine.

Bee-friendly
Drifts of blue cornflowers (Centaurea cyanus), corn chamomile (Anthemis arvensis) and corn marigold (Glebionis segetum).

Busy-Bee