White backgrounds are practically de rigueur . . . but

White-backgrounds-de-rigueur

When it comes to selling products online the received wisdom is that the white background rules. Even if it’s an item of clothing and being modelled on a human being more often than not the white background is de rigueur. Of course, there are still beautiful fashion shoots intricately styled and shot on location. Turning the pages of any fashion magazine or Sunday newspaper supplement and you see these photographs printed. The same images will also appear online on the opening pages of the brand’s website, but once you start clicking through to any specific product, there’s the model/product positioned hovering in the white, computer void.

I have to admit that I have bent to the norm of the white background, but in my heart of hearts I think colourful and complex, or dark and moody shoots produce infinitely more engaging images.

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Sheer – diaphanous yet elegant

Hand painted and steam fixed chiffon scarf Valeria lilac.
Hand painted and steam fixed chiffon scarf Valeria lilac.

Valeria lilac

Silk chiffon is a beautiful fabric to work with and a luxurious fabric to wear. The sheer, diaphanous quality allows a scarf to appear fluid subtly changing colour as it passes over your skin, your shirt or your dress.

Valeria black

A bright, eye-catching chiffon scarf can add an elegant, stylish accent too.

Soft lime and grey silk chiffon scarf Valeria lime.
Soft lime and grey silk chiffon scarf Valeria lime.

Valeria lime

My colourful and somewhat quirky Lorina Words chiffon scarf has just been uploaded to my shop. It was inspired by the long, long needlework pieces patiently embroidered by Lorina Bulwer see previous posts ‘Words, words, words’ Part 1 and Part 2 for further details about her life and work.

Lorina Words chiffon scarf inspired by the Victorian needleworker, Lorina Bulwer (1838-1912).
Lorina Words chiffon scarf inspired by the Victorian needleworker, Lorina Bulwer (1838-1912).

Lorina Words scarf

And, finally, I’d just like to thank the fashion blogger, Catherine Summers, from Not dressed as lamb and her Instagram link up which prompted me to revisit ‘Sheer’.

Not Dressed As Lamb

Strange, but perhaps not

Now-for-steamingA couple of years ago I painted some silk for a skirt. Then last week I saw this Saloni skirt featured in a magazine article and I thought that reminds me of a piece of silk I once painted.

I can’t remember what triggered my design idea. Thinking about it now I’m guessing there must have been some harlequin-like styling floating in the ether. After all these classic design patterns never totally disappear and they do come round every few years reinvented in a slightly different form.

And, the finished skirt.

Yellow-patterned-skirt