Lockdown 2.0 – A Walk in the Park

Here we are again. It is Day One of Lockdown 2.0. This second lockdown is in response to the rise of Covid 19 infections across England. And, what better time to take a walk in the local park.

For the next four weeks, and maybe or maybe not for longer, non-essential journeys to the beach or drives out to the countryside are not permitted and so, for town and city dwellers, the local parks will be the places to go for wide open spaces and greenery.

And Holywells Park in Ipswich has plenty of trees and a beautiful cascade of spring water ponds. It is a lovely park to stroll through.

The leaves are most certainly turning and some have already dropped, but there’s enough greenery to make the final stretch of my walk a dark and dramatic tunnel with light at the end, perhaps a metaphor for our times.

October Park – still looking rather green

Magnificent-oakLast weekend I took my camera with me on a walk round the local park to photograph the seasonal changes.

Beginning-to-turnSurprisingly, autumn has been slow to arrive. I am used to living further inland, but here in Ipswich, on a clear day from the ninth floor, you can see Felixstowe down on the coast 11 miles away.

Holywells-Park-OctoberI have concluded that being closer to the sea has kept temperatures slightly warmer in the local park and hence without a run of adequately cool nights the leaves are still to significantly change colour.

So far the most noticeable change is seen in the horse chestnuts. The leaves have turned crispy and brown, and many have dropped already. Sadly, I suspect the trees are suffering from bleeding canker disease caused by  Pseudomonas syringae pv aesculi.

On a more positive note there’s still plenty of colour in the wildflower meadow drifts.

Still-bloomingAnd, self-seeded here and there, the umbels of wild angelica brighten up the shady areas edging the bottom lake.

Wild angelica (Angelica sylvestris)
Wild angelica (Angelica sylvestris) found edging the bottom lake in dappled shade.

I wasn’t the only industrious individual stalking the park, the squirrels and jays were busy collecting autumn berries and acorns.

Jay-with-acorn