Spring Greens

As we move into early summer, I thought I’d pause for a second to take you on a short tour of my local park to see the fresh, light greens of spring.

Christchurch Mansion through the trees.

The horse chestnuts have reached full leaf and underneath their canopy the reduced light supplies dramatic contrasts between bold, sturdy tree trunks and verdant, recently cut grass.

Sweeping and undulating paths.

Together with the horse chestnuts, lime trees line the paths of the park accentuating the curves and sweeps.

The War Memorial through the trees.

There’s not just fresh green but delicate coppery apricot colours too.

Mature lime with old knobbly trunk.

The new leaves in the park are most welcome, but there’s something even more uplifting when you observe the re-emergence of sea kale (crambe maritime) on beaches at this time of year. The plant’s sheer tenacity as it pushes up through the salty shingle for another season of sun, wind and rain is very pleasing.

The new growth of crambe maritime (sea kale) on Sizewell Beach.

October Park – still looking rather green

Magnificent-oakLast weekend I took my camera with me on a walk round the local park to photograph the seasonal changes.

Beginning-to-turnSurprisingly, autumn has been slow to arrive. I am used to living further inland, but here in Ipswich, on a clear day from the ninth floor, you can see Felixstowe down on the coast 11 miles away.

Holywells-Park-OctoberI have concluded that being closer to the sea has kept temperatures slightly warmer in the local park and hence without a run of adequately cool nights the leaves are still to significantly change colour.

So far the most noticeable change is seen in the horse chestnuts. The leaves have turned crispy and brown, and many have dropped already. Sadly, I suspect the trees are suffering from bleeding canker disease caused by  Pseudomonas syringae pv aesculi.

On a more positive note there’s still plenty of colour in the wildflower meadow drifts.

Still-bloomingAnd, self-seeded here and there, the umbels of wild angelica brighten up the shady areas edging the bottom lake.

Wild angelica (Angelica sylvestris)
Wild angelica (Angelica sylvestris) found edging the bottom lake in dappled shade.

I wasn’t the only industrious individual stalking the park, the squirrels and jays were busy collecting autumn berries and acorns.

Jay-with-acorn