Catching up on those five buds of potential

Very-early-backgarden

Here is the group of five plants that were in bud at the beginning of June.

Buds-first-weekend-June

Now two weeks of early summer sun and light rain and . . . we now have the foxgloves out.

And the Oriental poppies, pink roses and the knautia.

The garden is full of daisies.

However, we’ve to wait a little for the salvia and then much later for the hollyhocks.

But time is marching on and it’s almost time to start clearing away the euphorbia bracts after all the seeds have popped out.

And-finishing-Euphorbia

Nature does yellow – nobody does it better


It’s that time of year when yellow is big in the garden and often just for a few days you might see people dressed in yellow. For us northern European folks yellow is a notoriously difficult colour to wear successfully. A pale lemon or a gentle soft buttercup knit may look fine in out northern light, but after the long winter and many indoor hours too often even pale yellow does not enhance a washed out and sometimes sickly complexion. Strong bright or piercing acidic yellows are mostly definitely out. And, it’s not just clothing, I’ve noticed how bright yellow cars appear less than appealing in our spring sunshine, yet somehow in the same light nature’s yellow is so satisfying.

Whether it’s cultivated daffodils, violas or forsythia, or even the humble roadside dandelion, nature’s yellow is eye-catching, refreshing and triumphant.

Oh dear – we all make mistakes!

Morning-Glory-underneathBack towards the end of June I planted out some Morning Glory seedlings. I usually put a couple in with an early flowering clematis to take over the flowering from mid summer and a couple more that will thread up into the wisteria. However, this year I had the bright idea to add some to twine round my dark red and bright pink dahlias and so I pushed in a few seedlings next to the dahlia tubers.

The dreaded bindweed. Convolvulus arvensis (photographed in a country hedgerow not my garden!)
The dreaded bindweed.
Convolvulus arvensis
(photographed in a country hedgerow not my garden!)

Spin forwards a couple of months, Morning Glory beautiful, but what is this ghastly, strangling white monster that looks so much like Morning Glory – arggh it’s bindweed in with my dahlias, quick yank it out. Then, oh dear, looking closer, I remember my little Morning Glory seedlings, too late, now ripped up and crushed. Of course, both plants are members of the Convolvulaceae family. When I was in Italy, in a warmer climate, I noticed a blue flower version that was as much a weed as white bindweed is here in England. However, as the blue ipomoea dies with the first frosts here it’s a wanted blue flower that’s grown as an annual and not a rampaging, nuisance weed.

The wanted truly blue Morning Glory. Ipomoea nil
The wanted, truly blue, Morning Glory.
Ipomoea nil

I survived the tail end of hurricane Bertha!

agapanthus bronze fennel
Survivor, but a little battered.
Agapanthus Headbourne hybrids and Foeniculum vulgare ‘Purpureum’
When old mother nature comes knocking at our door in the early hours of the morning what can we expect? I understand from the weather people that the UK has just been hit by a large, summer storm system that was the tail end of hurricane Bertha. Over the weekend there has been torrential rain and flooding and very strong winds.

In the garden the flowers have been bashed, half my raspberry canes are down and the runner beans have flopped over. But I am lucky I live at the top of a hill (yes there are few hills in Norfolk), and I feel very sorry for all the folks who have woken up to flooded houses. I hope the summer wind will dry out their rooms as fast as possible.

Meanwhile earlier this evening I set about saving the beans and spied this little beauty struggling on in less than ideal conditions.

monarda cerise pink bergamot
Monarda cerise pink.
Also known as bergamot or bee balm.