Where were the ships?

Bedecked-with-flags-one-JollyRogerLast weekend the Ipswich Maritime Festival took place. This year’s theme was ‘Pirates’, but to my big disappointment no tall ships turned up at the Ipswich Waterfront. I had been hoping for a visiting replica brigantine, or failing that, a nifty, suitably bedecked, sloop. According to nautical history both brigantines and sloops were favoured by 18th century pirates. Despite the restrictions (no hoisted sails within the dock area), a brigantine moored up along the quayside with a Jolly Roger fluttering in the breeze would have greatly added to the ‘pirate’ themed festival.

Of course the old Thames barges, Victor and Thalatta, that are based in Ipswich were present and they were joined, visiting from Harwich, by the Thames barge Kitty with her eye-catching green hull.

hames Barge Kitty
Thames Barge Kitty returning to Ipswich Waterfront at dusk during the Ipswich Maritime Festival 2018.

Along the quayside there were a variety of attractions amongst whom were representatives of the King’s 18th-century navy, sailors and marines, as well as a fine living statue of Admiral Lord Nelson himself! My goodness did the children jump when he came to life to greet them!

Nelson-actor-statue
Statue of Admiral Lord Nelson or not!

And, what is this   .   .   .   .

Escorting-Jack

I think some of our younger visitors were quite overwhelmed and just a little intimidated when coming face to face with the star of the ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’  Jack Sparrow. I wonder at what age, if ever, we outgrow the thrill of seeing up close a celebrity favourite even if they are only a look-a-like! I have no idea what the kids thought of the giant octopus hanging out (literally) at the Old Customs House. I was less than impressed and thought it simply looked large and bizarre.Visiting-octupusAnother oddity, and new to me, were the daytime fireworks. I think these might have been more effective in a different setting where the coloured smoke could have added some mystery to an old castle or a still dark lake. As it was the mundane background of boatyards and a muddle of yacht masts were all too prosaic.

However, the best event of the festival this year was definitely the Saturday evening fireworks – my photographs are better than last year’s, but there’s still plenty of room for improvement. Maybe next year I will remember to bring my tripod!

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Ipswich Maritime Festival

Ipswich-Maritime-Festival

Every two years the Ipswich Waterfront hosts a Maritime Festival. Held over a weekend the event is a nautical celebration featuring boats, international street food and a temporary fun fair.

Earl-of-Pembroke-1

Visiting boats line up along the quayside and the largest visitor this year was the Earl of Pembroke (1945) all the way from Bristol. Originally a schooner, the Earl of Pembroke was restored between 1985-1994 and commissioned as a three masted eighteenth century barque. You may have spotted her in Tim Burton’s film ‘Alice in Wonderland’ or in the TV series ‘Longitude’.

Another sailing beauty, the slender Essex smack Pioneer CK18 (built 1864), was moored up at the Waterfront joining some of the Old Thames barges (Victor, Thistle and Centaur) recently returned to the quayside for the Festival.

It wasn’t just sailing boats that were flaunting their nautical credentials. One of the last surviving steam inshore craft, Vic 96 (built 1945) was tied up alongside the tugboat Motor Tug Kent (1948).

This year’s theme was the recapture of Ipswich from the Vikings in 917AD and we did eventually spot a small group of folk with their historically accurate helmets and mail vests sitting at the back of the fun fair area. I am not sure authentic Anglo Saxon or Viking food would have been big sellers, but there were wild boar burgers, venison sausages, and a full hog roast available for hungry visitors.

Many of the ships and boats around the marina were decked out with colourful flags, but the best part of the weekend was the closing firework display. My photos were all shot through the rigging of the Earl of Pembroke.

I think the firework finale (below) flashing and banging over the ship gave a hint of what it might have been like in the past in the midst of a naval skirmish.

Finale.JPG

PS – Newsflash – July 2018 –

As of this year the Ipswich Maritime Festival is to take place annually. Perhaps this August I will get better firework photos!

 

 

 

Anonymous aliens arrive

Anonymous-aliens-arrive

The anonymous aliens release their messages for all humanity.
The anonymous aliens release their messages for all humanity.

Well, that was last night the 5th November.

Screenshot of Twitter last night, 5th November 2014, following the Million Mask March in London which attempted to protest at the Houses of Parliament, Westminster.
Screenshot of Twitter last night, 5th November 2014, following the Million Mask March in London which attempted to protest at the Houses of Parliament, Westminster.

Protesting in London on the way to the Houses of Parliament, rowdy, serious and in the end a little violent, but in reality it’s still business as usual despite the banking crash and the supposed, virtual meltdown of capitalism! And, back in the very, very ordinary world where I live the local council had a predictable, rather safe family affair ‘fireworks display’ in the community park opposite my street. Only, the tickets were too expensive for many families and so they came and parked down my road and the children stood on the pavement trying to see over the row of houses between them and the park.

Finale-I

Finale-II-burst

I think I'd prefer a visit from some anonymous aliens perhaps a few blue-sky thinking economists??
I think I’d prefer a visit from some anonymous aliens perhaps a few blue-sky thinking economists??

New Year’s Eve, London, 2013

Regent St lights 2013
Walking down Regent St, New Year’s Eve, 2013.
Trafalgar Square, London
Across Trafalgar Square, London at about 10.30 pm on New Year’s Eve.
Embankment New Year 2013-14
New Year’s Eve fireworks – view of the London Eye from Embankment.
London Eye New Year's Eve
Fireworks fire out from the London Eye.
Just visible in the burst is the London Eye
Just visible in the burst is the London Eye giving you sense of the scale of the display.
Firework finale
More is more – edible and scented!!
Happy New Year