Public Processions as Protest

R-Space Gallery CIC working with artist Lucy Turner and Seacort Print Workshop.

During these times of very strange, volatile, unpredictable, wobbly, erratic and, when you examine it all as a whole, completely chaotic politics, it is interesting to have a brief look at some ‘political’ slogans.

Rural Arts North Yorkshire with artist Angela Hall.

I am not going to engage with the Brexit shambles, but instead take a peak at a few slogan’s which were paraded in last summer’s celebration ‘Processions’ marking 100 years of votes for women.

‘Processions’ was a mass participation artwork to celebrate 100 years of votes for women. It was an open invitation to every woman and girl across the UK to get involved by being present on Sunday 10th June 2018 in one of the four UK capitals.

Greater North Belfast Women’s Network who worked with the National Museums, Northern Ireland.

Women from across the country gathered in Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London dressed in the colours of purple, green and white, and marched together inspired by the great processions of the suffragettes and the suffragists in the years leading up to 1918 and the coming of votes for women.

Millennium Court Arts Centre. International Women’s Friendship Group working with artist Tonya McMullan, Flax Art Studios.

One hundred women artists were commissioned to work with community groups and organisations to facilitate the creation of banners with participants collaborating in workshops generating ideas and collectively producing colourful, striking and thought-provoking banners.

Many of the banners trumpeted slogans with universal appeal.

Banners from Women of the Estuary (that is the Thames Estuary) hanging in the Ipswich Library.

And, some banners celebrated various sections of society with both professional and non-professional female practitioners acknowledged.

The Braids Art Centre, Ballymena, Northern Ireland with artist Rosalind Lowry.

Needless to say, I especially appreciated those banners referring to the worlds of creative women.

Mid Wales Arts Centre with artist Loraine Morley on display at DanceEast.

And, finally, on a personal note, having gone to school in Essex I was quietly amused by the Essex women’s bold take on owning their space in this world.

Metal Culture, Southend-on-Sea working with artist Heidi Wigmore.
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Author: agnesashe

Artisan, blogger and passionate East Anglian working from home.

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