Finding some floral magic

Local-park-flowersSo far it’s four months since I packed up my home and said good-bye to the flower garden and I am most definitely missing some summer floral interaction! These photos were taken in the local park, Holywells Park, a five minute walk from my temporary home.Park-terracesIt isn’t a huge park, but it is a most welcome sanctuary of green only five minutes from the very busy Ipswich Waterfront and less than a 20 minute walk from the city centre.

The Winerack from Holywells Park Ipswich

Through the trees, just visible, is ‘The Winerack’ the skeletal structure of a half-finished tower block located on the Ipswich Waterfront.

The park is spread across 67 acres and features a variety of wildlife habitats including ponds, woodland and meadow areas as well as more than enough space for humans to walk their dogs.

For a gardenless person like me, there are also more formal plantings. Borders full of flowers, mostly lavender and alchemilla mollis, that soften the edges of the terraces between the old buildings. visiting-beeWe have had some hot weather during the last month and only a couple days of any rain, and I think that the phlox has bolted and is running to seed, but it is still providing plenty of food for the bees.

It was a very pleasant space to spend a quiet half hour during the early morning and I couldn’t believe the noise and pollution that hit me as soon as I ventured back out into the morning rush hour! At least these beautiful lilies bring the scent of a summer garden into the flat.
Lilies

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About agnesashe

Artisan, blogger and passionate East Anglian working from home.
This entry was posted in Flowers, Ipswich and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Finding some floral magic

  1. margaret21 says:

    That park definitely seems a cut above. We’re lucky in both Harrogate and Ripon, but so many urban parks no longer seem to manage interesting planting.

    • agnesashe says:

      I think the key to this one is a combination of paid staff and volunteers and the drive for mostly naturalistic, right plant right place landscaping, apparently with a nod to Gertrude Jekyll. Also it was originally the grounds of Holywells House built in 1814 and benefits from the 19th-century’s planting for posterity outlook which leaves us with some beautiful old trees.

  2. What a lot of beauty in a small space. I especially liked the lavender. And bees.

  3. agnesashe says:

    It is a charming park. As I often write, East Anglia is the driest part of the UK and lavender is an ideal plant to flourish in an urban park especially if time and money is likely to result in no artificial irrigation.

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