A creative process – medieval art, craft and artisans (part 4)

As with all creative processes, repeating it rarely results in a second identical copy and as often as not a practitioner makes minor adjustments each time they make a new piece for a series.

Obviously, in my Ranworth collection I have used different panels from the rood screen as inspiration for different colour combinations, but as I’ve worked on each scarf I have also slightly changed the pattern details too.

These scarves have ended up similar, but different. I have endeavoured to capture the relationship between my inspiration and the finished work, but it is tricky to accurately reproduce the qualities of the colours in a photo for a computer/mobile screen. (For your info at the moment these scarves are at the Smiths Row at Christmas Exhibition).

When the unnamed medieval artisans rendered their very beautiful images onto the Ranworth rood screen the colours would have been fresh and vibrant. Perhaps those artisans would be shocked at our 21st-century sensibility that so favours these now scarred and faded images not for their religious content, but their visual charm and serendipitous survival.

Gilded archangel
Detail of the archangel above St Barbara from the St John the Baptist chapel, St Helen’s, Ranworth.

Author: agnesashe

Artisan, blogger and passionate East Anglian working from home.

4 thoughts on “A creative process – medieval art, craft and artisans (part 4)”

  1. It’s fascinating to see your work process. And your comment about the original vivid colors struck me. Once a piece of art is made, it lives its own life and orginal meanings, even appearances, can be lost or transformed over time. Something to think about.

    1. Yes, you are so right – reinterpretations certainly keep art historians busy! It’s not unusual to hear authors discussing their work commenting on how their characters leave the pages of a novel and take on their own lives and I think it happens with visual creations too, but in a less obvious way.

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