Painterly tulips, Balthasar van der Ast and May Day

Tulipa-Princess-IreneMy friends know I enjoy down time in the garden and little garden gifts are much appreciated. I always plant out everything I’m given, but sometimes the colours don’t fit well with a particular planting. This situation at first may appear disappointing, but in general, it is a bonus as I don’t feel guilty when I immediately cut them for the house.

Every spring these striking red and yellow tulips (tulipa Gavota) return and, despite plenty of background green, do not fit with the main pink, white and orange display in the back bed. Therefore, it is the chop!

On cutting and arranging them I was reminded of the Dutch craze for tulips in the seventeenth century and the many beautiful still life oil paintings of floral displays that included tulips. The above painting, ‘Flowers in a vase with shells and insects’, is by Balthasar van der Ast and now hangs in the National Gallery, London. Photographic reproductions do not do these type of paintings justice. With a close examination of the flowers in the painting I can clearly see an iris, some tulips, a rose, some carnations, a pale pink and white antirrhinum, and, more in the shadows a fritillary and a sprig of mauve lilac.

I don’t grow carnations and I have lost all my snake’s head fritillaries as my soil is far too gritty and parched, but I’ve just been out in the garden (May Day) and located examples of flowers in the painting. Although some are by no means in full bloom and others have nearly gone over, the snap dragons (antirrhinum Night and Day) have not even started producing buds! We all know that the professional growers can keep flowering back or force it forwards, just think what they do for Chelsea each year, and I’m guessing some of these skills are centuries old. But we must not forget that however true to life a work of art may appear it is still the product of the artist’s creative interpretation. All those different flowers may or may not have been together in that pewter jug sometime in May 1630.

And, this wouldn’t be a May Day post without a photo of the classic May-tree blossom – the hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata) – commonly used for garlands (outside the house only) for a traditional English May Day celebration.

Crataegus-laevigata

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Author: agnesashe

Artisan, blogger and passionate East Anglian working from home.

3 thoughts on “Painterly tulips, Balthasar van der Ast and May Day”

  1. Ah, just had a flashback to the days when we did have a garden – albeit we had no idea what we were doing. We had a lot of hawthorn, although I recall its botanic name was raphiolepis (indica I think).

    1. Indian hawthorn is in the same plant family as the common European hawthorn, but we don’t grow it much here in the UK ‘cos we don’t usually have enough SUNSHINE!!! I just looked it up and a couple of nurseries sell it here. It looks like it has potential for the future if we really do start to get more sun with climate change, but who knows.

  2. Ah yes, we were living in a microclimate on the plains which formed a basin before the rise of the blue mountains. Hot, dry, clay soil. We had a great collection of weed, lantana, oleander, lavender, Rosemary, agapanthus, African daisies, and others whose names I will recall in future days. Where we live now we have a professional gardener, and lots of strelitzia.

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